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Doggystyle, a downtown hot dog restaurant, highlights national culture.arts and entertainment

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What is a delicious hot dog?

The answer often depends on who you are and where you come from.

Andrew Mincieli was born and raised in New York and has been providing answers for years.

“I love a good hot dog with tomatoes and onions,” Mincieri said. “Natural Casing Sablet he hot dog is about to pop the moment you bite into it.”

The problem was that when he moved to the Sarasota area years ago, he couldn’t find the exact tastes and sensations.Mincieli started buying ingredients at home and making his own hot dogs. but it wasn’t the same.

He found a better solution when he visited the Doggystyle restaurant in downtown Sarasota, founded by Connecticut native and Sarasota resident Steve DiBio.

The Hotdog locale has one specific hook. Its menu emphasizes hot dog styles from specific regions. This included Chicago, Philadelphia, Texas, Kansas City styles and, importantly for Mincieri, exactly the New York style dog he was looking for.

“[New York hot dogs]were exactly what I was used to,” Mincieri said. “If I go anywhere near my house[in Dibaio]I’ll have a hot dog there. You can’t get a good hot dog here.”

DiBio has been tracking hot dog recipes and variations for years.

After spending time as a minor league baseball player, DiBio wrote down variations for each recipe and approach. He’s been collecting these notes for his 30 years, but relatively recently decided to put his knowledge to work when he opened his restaurant.

red onion sauce? It’s New York. From West Virginia to Georgia, everyone likes mustard, chili, and coleslaw, but Divio says West Virginians often add onions, while Georgians leave out the chiles. I’m making slow dog. The Dog of Memphis, in his shop, barbecues his bacon topped with sauces and onions. And in his one region of the country, which DiBio hasn’t named, he likes to eat hot dogs with barbecued macaroni and cheese.

“We wanted to give[tourists]a little bit of a taste of home, like being here,” Divio said. “People say it’s hard to find good pizza. And it’s hard to find good hot dogs.”

DiBio’s family grew up in the culinary world. He grew up in Connecticut and started working in restaurants when he was 14, but his path to amassing hot dog recipes came from elsewhere.

He began his tour in the minor leagues in 1989 playing as a pitcher.

It took him around the country, and Divio felt like seeing what the different regions he visited had to offer in terms of food.

“I was dying for a hot dog[while in Carolina]and I was just disappointed,” Divio said. “I started wondering where I could get a good hot dog.

As DiBio went from town to town, he noticed contrasts in how people acted about dogs.

Some areas, like the Carolinas, for example, allow any type of average hot dog meat, but rely heavily on the toppings. We rated it and had no problem mixing the toppings.

“Where I’m from, hot dogs were king, but the toppings were different for everyone,” Divio said. “There, no one knew what dogs they were eating, but the toppings were wacky.

Massachusetts native Dakota DuBois has been missing New England-style hot dogs since moving to Sarasota two years ago. Since randomly stepping into doggy style, he’s been able to get a taste of home.

“The outside of the New England-style bread is like a toastable loaf, not the bulky, round look you see at Publix,” says DuBois. “The meat in it tastes better than what’s in a typical Oskar Meyer. I missed it—it’s what I’m used to.”

DiBio attributes many of the variations and influences of different recipes and styles across the country to the cultural influences of immigrants that have spread over decades. ”

“If you grew up in an industrial area with jobs and immigration, you probably had 1,000 years of European food culture dropped on your doorstep,” Divio says. “New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Newark, Immigration have built-in customer bases, and supply chains were built to feed all of these people.”

He doesn’t think Florida has much of an indigenous hot dog culture — he says the immigrant-based biggest contribution to Florida’s food culture is Cuban sandwiches — but he’s a fan of barbecue sauce. I noticed that toppings are becoming more and more popular.

As the Sarasota area has changed, so has the demographic that visits Doggystyle.

While many visitors come from the Midwest, particularly Chicago and Michigan, DiBio has noticed an increasing influx of Northerners seeking their own recipes as the months go by. Not to mention vegan.

“Hot dogs were dying[culturally]in a way, but we’re going the other way,” Divio said. “People find it funny.


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