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139—Reply to Fr.Gregory Pine: Film, Music, Reflection

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catholic culture podcast ( Bio – Article – Email ) | Aug 12, 2022 | on Catholic Culture Podcast

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In a recent video about Pint with Aquinas Channel, Gregory Pine, OP, expresses his concern that popular entertainment, especially music and cinema, often becomes an obstacle to achieving the celestial purpose of contemplation with which we are born. It’s worth noting that unlike typical Catholic commentary on pop culture, Fr.

In this discussion inspired by Fr. Pine’s point is that host Thomas Mills and filmmaker Nathan Douglas not only identify some elements of music and film that interfere with a meditative life, but rather than simply avoiding music and film. , to suggest ways to better engage with the arts. The meditative end of man.

Time stamp:

0:00 intro

6:31 Kinyomatsu video recap

11:08 Risk of treating media as ‘junk food’ instead of demanding better media

14:44 Cultivate an openness to more artistic films

17:31 Discursive reasoning is not the best mode of reflection

20:26 Music is the simplest meditative art form

22:58 Relationship between movies and reality

25:13 Advertising and gloss in modern cinema

29:38 Problems in putting Catholic content into Hollywood format

31:28 Film editing rhythms can interfere with reflection

38:24 Intuitively learn to distinguish between hackwork and good craft

42:15 Rhythmic excitement isn’t trivial

46:23 Film discussion conclusion

48:02 Application of Augustine’s theory of evil as deficiency to art

49:34 The need for both lower and higher music

55:46 In what sense should Catholics be ‘engaged in popular culture’?

59:33 Computer-dominated pop music, lyric-centric, lack of melody

1:07:53 The personal element in art

1:12:08 Music beyond words, sensations and reflections

1:18:22 Physical stimulation with music

1:22:45 Pamper your emotions with music

1:27:09 Can music be ‘immoral’?

1:32:06 Mistaking slow and good in movies

1:34:11 Education that gives believers artistic depth

1:43:50 Can sensory images help our spiritual life?

1:49:18 What music tells us about reality

1:56:20 there is no beauty formula

2:01:08 Simple Receptivity to God’s Beauty

2:03:54 Recommended resources

Means:

Father. Gregory Pine, “I stopped listening to music.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVh4rHubNOc

Elizabeth Paul Labatt The Song That I Am: On Music Mysteries https://litpress.org/Products/MW040P/The-Song-That-I-Am

Etienne Gilson beautiful art https://www.amazon.com/Arts-Beautiful-Scholarly-Etienne-Gilson/dp/1564782506

Criteria: The Catholic Film Podcast https://www.catholicculture.org/commentary/category/criteria

CCP #126: How Charlie Parker’s Music Changed My Life https://www.catholicculture.org/commentary/126-how-charlie-parker-changed-my-life

CCP #28: Introduction to Maritan’s Poetic Philosophy by Samuel Hazo https://www.catholicculture.org/commentary/episode-28-introduction-to-maritains-poetic-philosophy-samuel-hazo

Nathan Douglas movie mission https://vocationofcinema.substack.com

Father. Pine lectures on literature referenced by Nathan https://soundcloud.com/thomisticinstitute/literature-as-philosophy-fr-gregory-pine-op

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Theme music: “Franciscan Eyes”, written and performed by Thomas Mills.

Thomas V. Mills New York-based pianist. He is the director of his CatholicCulture.org podcast, hosts The Catholic Culture Podcast, and co-hosts Criteria: The Catholic Film Podcast. See full bio.

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