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Most parents believe their children should possess basic skills: polls

Nearly six out of ten parents have revealed that they often send text messages to their children to come to dinner instead of calling them.

A survey of 2,000 American parents with school-aged children found that the average child received their first smartphone at the age of 10. Technology continues to evolve, but a few things remain the same, as the average parent says he was 11 years old when he first got his first personal technology, such as a desktop computer or laptop. ..

Seven in ten (70%) parents trust their children in technology, and two-thirds (66%) have parental controls on all their children’s devices due to security concerns. Six out of ten (62%) also believe that technology is beneficial to their children’s social skills.

Kids play on the phone
According to a study conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Cricket Wireless, the average age of introducing technology to children remains at 10. Photo without date.
Francesca Collado, SWNS / Zenger

Parents use it for urgent purposes in their youth to help them acquire technical skills for future work (47%), and because they have shown maturity (46%) They said they decided to give them a smartphone (55%).

The study, conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Cricket Wireless, also found that more than two-thirds (67%) believe their children have access to technology, no matter how harsh.

Half of parents (50%) buy their children as non-smartphones or basic feature phones with the aim of avoiding “distracting apps” (65%) and maintaining basic features such as calling and texting. I am considering it. No internet access (65 percent).

Interestingly, 54% of parents bought a basic feature phone for their kids to share the nostalgia of the 90’s and early 2000’s. Nostalgia trends and technologies are re-emerged, connecting with the next generation with legacy devices and showing how far technology has progressed.

“It’s important for families to be able to choose the level of technology their kids use, whether they want to share the nostalgia of the 90s or restrict Internet access until their kids reach a certain age,” said the vice president. Tony Mokry, also and Chief Marketing Officer, said. Cricket Wireless officer.

“It relies on connectivity for flexibility and security to keep parents and children safe and engaged anytime, anywhere.”

Kids play video games on smartphones
Children play video games on their smartphones while attending a public event held in Rüsselsheim, Germany on September 22, 2012. A survey of 2,000 American parents with school-aged children found that the average child received their first smartphone at the age of 10.
Sean Gallup / Getty Images

Polls also quizzed children aged 6 to 18 about their knowledge of older technology devices. When the image of the old gadget is displayed, almost half (49%) cannot identify the landline and only 28% know what the floppy disk is, explaining the name and usage of the answering machine. Only 26% said they could. ..

Half of parents (51%) said their children used the family’s phone plan for an average of 3.6 years. Of these parents, 9 in 10 (90%) feel that their children are using the device as expected, such as for school, e-learning, and social purposes.

70% of parents say that if their children understand how to use these devices safely and effectively, they will be more open about providing their children with tablets, smartphones, or smartwatches.

“When we get back to school, putting our kids on the family’s phone plan gives them an affordable option to stay connected and make their kids more happy,” Mokry said. Stated.

Old technology that children could identify in pictures

  • Landline-51%
  • Fax machine-38%
  • Nintendo Entertainment System (NES)-29%
  • Floppy disk-28%
  • Answering machine-26%
  • Pager-24%
OnePoll Kids and Technical Survey Results
According to a study conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Cricket Wireless, the average age of introducing technology to children is 10 years.
Francesca Collado, SWNS / Zenger

Produced in collaboration with SWNS.

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