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How the StageCraft Yacht Experience is a New Way of Entertainment – ​​Robb Report

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For the latest fads that keep yacht owners on the edge of the steering wheel, consider a trick that even world-renowned magician David Copperfield will challenge. Instantly transport a 1,000-foot superyacht underwater, allowing guests to experience the twilight zone of the ocean. Leave the main salon.

The stagecraft experience created by London-based Berkeley Rand requires the creation of underwater drones, high-resolution cameras, augmented reality techniques, and numerous digital effects wizards. “The West Coast tech giant is an important member of our audience,” says Berkeleyland co-founder Andrew Grant Super. “The complexity of trying to entertain the three generations of power families who have seen it all is stuffy, but they love our work.”

Prices range from $ 350,000 to about $ 2 million, and the company’s revitalization includes a trip to the lost city of Atlantis using both yachts and submersibles, and a pop-up Michelin Star restaurant on the sand shelves of the Maldives. It contains. Originally developed as a US military camouflage technology, the 3D layer digital panel seems to have seen waiters and food out of nowhere. Or consider an adventure a few years ago when Berkeleyland helped recreate the Battle of Midway and turned a client’s superyacht into a World War II American battleship. The effect is a virtual battle between cordite floating in the sea breeze and an enemy fighter with the smell of cannon fire, as well as a full-body tactile suit that allows the wearer to feel the “fire” of the ship coming in. Was included. Each trip is supervised by the brand’s Mayfair headquarters and supported by up to 40 leading creative technology professionals from entertainment and technology powerhouses, including Marvel Studios, Apple, Disney, Google and even NASA.

Of course, according to the most common usage, “stagecraft” is about the technical aspects of theater production, such as stage art, props, lighting, and machinery, and in fact, many experiences are less virtual and more. It’s realistic. Think of a perfect outfit. Produces Broadway hits. Professional actors perform in Floats, which float right next to a yacht, or recreate a miniature Burning Man in the Arctic Circle.

Adventure travel agency Peroras has arranged a Bond-themed treasure hunt in Greenland. Yacht owners and guests hike barren landscapes, unlock clues and use the abandoned radar station as an overnight campsite. Or, if that seems too easy, in a controlled high-pressure alternative reality using an actor and professional production team, named after the psychological thriller starring Michael Douglas and Sean Penn. Consider the immersive experience of Perolas. Guests can participate in phased car chase and extreme survival jungle missions involving special forces, intelligence agencies, and counterterrorism experts.

“It goes far beyond your typical travel and yacht encounter,” says Perolas travel designer Venetian Stag. “Themes and content are tailored to individual clients, but we call on government officials and military contacts to assist in staging a series of bucketlist events. That’s what you always want to do. But it’s a way to experience what you could never do. ”

There is also an NFT component that allows guests to own a tradable blueprint for a bespoke experience as well as repeatable with Fangible Tokens. Super describes this as a viable “instruction manual” (for additional activation) as many times as the client likes.

Although they are currently only available in cryptocurrencies, ownership can also make the owner a stakeholder in royalties if they want to sell NFTs in the future.

If you’re part of that superyacht crowd, this new evolution of high-budget, high-value personalized entertainment may have been ordered by a doctor, perhaps Doctor Who.

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