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Biden returns to climate drawing board after Mad Rush (1)

Hours after Senator Joe Manchin delivery Deadly blow To Climate Change Law Supported by Joe BidenWhite House officials have begun to plan for the president to handle the matter on his own.

They wanted to act fast. Towards the weekend, the historic heatwave news burning cities from Phoenix to London seemed to underscore the urgency of the climate threat. And they had the perfect stage to announce their bold actions. In a few days, Biden gave a speech about clean energy in front of a closed Massachusetts coal-fired power plant.

His aides worked diligently on plans to show that he was aggressively and unilaterally attacking climate change. They offer a menu of options, including an urgent declaration that unleashes a drastic executive branch that allows Biden to potentially block crude oil exports, fund clean energy construction and reduce offshore oil drilling. Drafted.

See: President Joe Biden called climate change an “existential threat” and an “emergency” while announcing new policies to combat its effects on Wednesday.

Source: Bloomberg

Then, before the speech, Biden himself put a pause. No urgent declaration-not yet. He sends his aides back to the drawing board, where they remain, delicately treating Senate politics, not only passing through legal convocations, but also drawing ambitious paths that bring measurable results to voters. I tried that.

New campaigns will be rolled out in the coming weeks and policy initiatives could impact manufacturing, transportation and other sectors. There are still likely to be urgent proclamations. But the enthusiastic effort to get there (speaking by people familiar with the deliberations) avoids the narrowly divided parliament, even though the White House is trying to move independently. It suggests that you are having a hard time.

QuickTake: What Biden can do after declaring a climate emergency

The administration spent months accumulating a set of possible policies to deploy in the event of a parliamentary parley collapse, but they were not ready.

After Manchin’s move, aides began drafting orders to trigger immediate intervention, honing ideas for action that the president and federal agencies could take swiftly. Those familiar with the matter said some government officials had participated to assist in the development of policy plans.

White House National Climate Advisor Gina McCarthy She canceled her travel plans, stayed in Washington, DC, and presented the White House Chief of Staff with options and their potential implications. Ron KlainBruce Reed and Biden’s Deputy Chief of Staff.

By the end of Monday, some officials had not made a decision, but were preparing for a possible mid-week climate emergency declaration, two people familiar with the matter said.

By noon on Tuesday, Wednesday’s speech strategy no longer included an urgent declaration.

Biden was pressured his aides to act swiftly-putting actions that could be offered in short order on the table. But he emphasized that the plan needs to be fully embodied and as strong as possible. On Wednesday, Biden acknowledged his tension. “I’m trapping all the authority I have,” he told reporters.

Read more: Biden cites climate threats and stops before declaring an emergency

It did not determine the factors that postponed the urgent declaration, but there were political considerations, well-known people said.

For example, there was a debate about the timing of the climate declaration. This can disrupt Congressional work on medical law, well-known people said. Senate dynamics were part of the calculus, said one executive who asked not to give a name to explain the deliberations. Despite Manchin’s withdrawal of support for the climate change package, the White House doesn’t want to keep him away-coal and gas abundance where voting is important to pass important legislation in the Senate Moderate Democrat from West Virginia.

At the same time, the menu of policy announcements possible in Biden’s speech was narrowed down. From Sunday to Tuesday evening, about half a dozen iterations of the portfolio were considered. The aide tried to balance what was immediately feasible with the risk of seemingly doing too little.

In one example, an aide considered revoking an order from the former president. Donald Trump This is believed to be blocking the lease of new offshore wind farms in the southernmost part of the United States. Eventually, Biden stopped short of the abolition and instead instructed the Secretary of the Interior. Deb Haaland Promote the development of wind in the area.

Read more: Biden boosts wind power in the oil-rich Gulf of Mexico

After all, Biden’s speech focused on the extreme heat exacerbated by climate change. He has helped low-income families buy air conditioners and fund billions of dollars in federal grant programs to build resilience to heat waves, hurricanes and other climate disasters. Announced expansion.

Special Envoy for Climate Change John Kerry Said The New York Times states that Biden is “very close” to the declaration of a national state of emergency regarding climate. It doesn’t matter when that happens, Kelly said.

While the next steps are being set out, lobbyists for renewable energy and environmental benefits will discuss how Biden can use the president’s authority to grow clean energy and curb fossil fuels. We are passing our own proposals to the White House. Analysts expect the president to focus on developing green energy before the November elections, rather than attacking fossil fuels.

In the end, Biden didn’t want Congress to take no action to determine how people see the United States moving on this issue, McCarthy said.

“So what you saw on Wednesday was basically the president who took the ball and had the opportunity to say we were going to run on it,” she said. “And you’ll see it coming.”

(Add Kelly’s comment to the fourth to last paragraph.)

-With support from Josh Wingrove..

To contact reporters about this story:
Jennifer A. Dlouhy Washington jdlouhy1@bloomberg.net;
Jennifer Jacobs Washington jjacobs68@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story:
Simon Casey At scasey4@bloomberg.net

Catherine Traywick

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